Monday, 16 March 2015

Mathew 6:9-13 by Susan L.

  I've been doing a lot of thinking about the Lord's Prayer. It's not been anything concrete, just random musings over the meaning and significance of those few words. It struck me that most of the time I say it without truly leaning into the incredible seriousness and joy the prayer contains. It  rattles off the tongue so fast there isn't time to think on what is being said. This prayer was learned in school before it was banned and like all things familiar and repetitive, it has lost its significance over time. It's a shame because it is an incredibly powerful prayer that contains every single aspect of what being a Christian is about.
  Yesterday at church, the video teaching was on that exact subject. Much of what was taught mirrored my own rather vague ideas.
  I thought I'd do something a bit different by breaking down the prayer to help cement its heart into my own. This is merely a preliminary sketch.
  "Our Father". First of all, as yesterdays teaching said, this identifies Who we are praying to so there is no interference. For myself, it speaks of belonging. God, the Father, is ours and we are His. Forever!
  "In heaven". We need to put the address like mailing a letter that way it doesn't land in another father's mailbox. There's only One who could hear us.
  "Hallowed be Your name." He is our most holy One, above all, Beloved, Pure beyond human understanding.  Like grains of sand on a beach the name of God is infinite. He is far more than Father. Creator and Provider. That's something I'd like to explore in more detail: the names of God.
  "Your kingdom come." I had thought it might mean a call to speed the day the Lord Jesus returns. That's is part of it. It's also an intercessory prayer against the forces of evil who are bound and determined to keep us from our Lord.
  "Your will be done." That's a biggy. And I pray, help me set aside that which would keep me apart from You. Help me surrender to the tender leading of the Holy Spirit. Help me hear His voice. I desire with all my heart that Your will for my life be the path I choose.
  "On earth as it is in heaven." There would be nothing that separates us from Jesus. What else? This line confirms that heaven is a real place that is way better than this earth we labour on.
  "Give us this day our daily bread." This doesn't mean just PBJ's for lunch. And I pray, feed my soul, my spirit, my life with a daily dose of Your presence. Oh...It's a gift! We don't have to do anything to earn this feast except ask.
  "And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors." Repentance and forgiveness. The King James version uses the word trespasses instead of debt. It's a reminder that we are to forgive others as Jesus sacrifice on the Cross allows us to be forgiven our sins. It's a reminder that we can hurt others just as we've been hurt. It edifies compassion, grace, and love.
   "And do not lead us into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one." And I pray, help me be strong in face of temptation or anything that would try to separate me from my Father, my Saviour, and the Holy Spirit. It also acknowledges our foe is very real and that particular being is focused completely on our destruction. In Christ, he has no power.
  "For Yours is the Kingdom and the power and the glory forever." I give it all back to You, my Lord. May every aspect of who You created me to be: creative, determined, and capable and Your gifts of righteous anger, passion, gentleness, gratitude, patience, trust and faith be used to glorify You. (That's my own celebratory list of ten!)
  You are the Author of my destiny. Glory and praise to God above.
  I'm open to more thoughts on the Lords Prayer. Please feel free to comment.

3 comments:

  1. In our Anglican "Book of Alternative Services" one line has been changed quite a bit. "Lead us not into temptation" has been changed to "Save us from the time of trial". To me, the original line implies I need to pay attention but the latter implies that God will guard me.

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  2. Beautiful thoughts. Meditating on the Word is a wonderful life giving action to do. Some say they don't know how to meditate, but I heard that if you can murmur or worry, you can meditate. It is basically the same thing. Thanks for sharing.

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  3. Thank you both for commenting. Definitely food for thought.

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